Category Archives: Presidents

#199 – Leave It To Beaver Theme Song

Standard

#199 – Leave It To Beaver Theme Song

 – The television sitcom Leave It To Beaver portrayed the television image of Middle America in the late 1950’s and early 60’s. Everything was perfect. The family unit included a nice house, a mom and a dad, and two kids. Dad supported the family; mom took care of the family and any problems the kids were in could be solved by the family within a half hour episode.

Were things really that simple? Maybe on television, but not in real life.

The 1960’s, as many of us remember the decade, was simmering in the background. The show was broadcast into our living rooms each week in glorious black and white beginning October 4, 1957 until signing off on June 20, 1963. Elvis was still pre-army when viewers first met the Cleaver family and when the final episode aired we were only five months away from JFK’s fateful trip to Dallas.

In May 1963 Bob Dylan released his second album, The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan, with songs about civil rights and nuclear war. In August Dr. Martin Luther King declared “I have a dream” in Washington D.C. and went on to be named Time Magazine’s Man Of The Year. And The Beatles were gearing up for a televised surprise attack on our senses that came on February 9, 1964.

Along with many other factors including The Space Race, The Cold War and The Vietnam War, our generation was in for a change. A BIG change. The sitcoms – and many are considered classic and still very entertaining – were far from being reality shows for the era.

The Cleavers

Leave It To Beaver was one of the moving picture postcards of The American Dream delivered into our living rooms every week. As referred to above, it was broadcast in black and white. But when you think about it, there really was no “black and white” on television during these years. Except for African Americans appearing as guest stars or supporting players, the first black leading character on a network series didn’t happen until 1965 when Bill Cosby starred in I Spy with Robert Culp.

As a member of the younger edge of baby boomers (I was five years younger than Jerry Mathers, who played Theodore “The Beaver” Cleaver), Leave It To Beaver was one of my weekly looks at the outside world. But it really didn’t seem that much different from where I was growing up in northern Ohio. School, friends, girls (not always the same as “friends”), dealing with teenagers and respecting adult authority were about as deep as things got. I was fortunate that my parents were always more open than some of the others. My mother was from Detroit and they both enjoyed taking me on weekend excursions to other big cities such as Cleveland, New York and Chicago.

————————————————————————

20% OFF Author Signed Copies!

The Beatles At Shea Stadium

The story behind their greatest concert and making the TV special

20% OFF Retail Price with FREE Shipping (Continental U.S. Only)

Signed by the author and only through the website – BeatlesSheaStadium.com

————————————————————————

In all honesty, that’s where I’d see minorities. But the cities to me were exotic places with energy, excitement and adventures on every block and didn’t seem to exclude anyone because of color, sex or religion. As a young visitor in those days before the race-related riots of the 1960’s, I was never exposed to any inner city problems. Like the Cleavers and their social circle in Leave It To Beaver, it was life in a protected bubble. But these youthful real world experiences in big cities helped me form the opinion there were no reasons why we all couldn’t – or shouldn’t – live together.

Not The Cleavers

So when I write about the dramatic changes that still make the 1960’s the most talked about and studied decade of the Twentieth Century, The American Dream and The American Reality on how the 60’s played out serve as bookends. Start with Leave It To Beaver and end with the film Woodstock and you’ll understand why Boomers are so passionate about this decade of change.

For the first generation to be accused of having television as an adult authority figure, sitcoms were our windows to the outside world. And just like race, sex and religion, what we learned from television went a long way in defining how we look at the world – and how the world looks at us.

One of my favorite (and funniest) personal examples happened more than twenty years after Leave It To Beaver faded off into rerun land. I was living in New York City and breaking into the comedy biz. Before ending up with my career “behind the scenes,” I did stand-up comedy. But once again in all honesty, I lacked the necessary edge that in my opinion makes seasoned NYC comedians the funniest. After one particular bleak performance on stage at a famous comedy club, a couple of my black comedian friends (while laughing) told me I was too “white bread” to be truly funny. I was too Ricky Nelson from Ozzie and Harriett, which is another television postcard of 1950’s and 60’s American Dream.

And you know what? I laughed with them because it was true. There was no way around the stereotyping. But looking back, even my friends didn’t get it right. I was more Theodore “The Beaver” Cleaver in the 60’s than the cool Ricky Nelson from the 50’s.

————————————————————————

Classic Rock Logo

Follow The Classic Rocker!

Then visit Dave’s author page on Amazon.com

————————————————————————

The Leave It To Beaver Theme Song (actual title; The Toy Parade) is a classic example of the catchy tunes that lured viewers to their television sets and can still set off nostalgic memories for the boomer generation. I’ll even go out on a limb and say most of us can hum it all the way through (there are lyrics, but never heard on the show) just like we can sing I Want To Hold Your Hand and She Loves You. This particular TV tune waxed nostalgic in my waking mind on May 9th. Since it doesn’t fit the classic rock requirements to be on my digital playlist, I can’t remember the last time I heard it and The Toy Parade falls onto the subliminal side of the Dream Song List.

Eddie Haskell

One comic element of Leave It To Beaver that has stayed real for me through the decades is the supporting character Eddie Haskell. If I were to ever list my all-time favorite television characters, he would have to be in the Top 10. Played by Ken Osmond who later left showbiz to become a police officer, Eddie Haskell embodies the heart, soul and devious mind of every wise guy kid who ever stirred up any type of trouble and tried to schmooze his way out of it by being overly polite and agreeable toward whatever adult authority was coming down on him.

My dad, who had a wonderful sense of humor and could make me laugh until I cried, would compare my friends and me to Eddie Haskell whenever we tried to talk our way out of whatever predicament we had gotten ourselves into. And I also used it to describe my son to anyone that might remember the legendary TV name.

Since he was born in 1995, I’m sure Paul has no idea who Eddie Haskell is. But when someone from my generation gushed over how nice and polite he was while growing up, I reminded them of this iconic television character. They knew immediately what I was talking about. Kids can still be typical kids before the BIG changes of adulthood and no different than we were growing up in the 60’s. And similar to when we started asserting our independence while moving into our teenage years, there were many times at home when I felt I was talking to Eddie Haskell in all his American Dream wise guy glory.

The only glitch in the process was that I had grown out of my Eddie Haskell phase. I’ve reverted back to being The Beaver.

The theme song arrangement changed during the years, with the final season using a “swing” style. Below is the opening sequence to Leave It To Beaver from season four, which is the one that scored on this list.

If you’re a dedicated fan, you can purchase the complete Leave It To Beaver series on DVD from Amazon.com. Also separate seasons and episodes are available through the link.

——————————————————————————–

Twitter

Dave Schwensen is The Classic Rocker and author of The Beatles At Shea Stadium and The Beatles In Cleveland. Visit Dave’s author page on Amazon.com.

Copyright 2017 – North Shore Publishing

Beatles Program

#209 – Hey Jude

Standard

#209 – Hey Jude by The Beatles

heyjude2 – It’s easy to look back at an event and think, “Yeah, that’s when that happened.” Time gives you a historical perspective or as the old saying goes, “Hindsight is 20/20.” To go even further with this thought and put it into Classic Rocker terms, I’ll borrow a 1972 a song title and lyric from Johnny Nash:

I Can See Clearly Now.

There have been countless books written about the Beatles and like most dedicated fans, I’ve read many of them. With the passage of time, more often than not researchers and historians who are not first generation fans write the latest books. There’s nothing wrong with that. It’s similar to new books about George Washington or Abraham Lincoln. No one writing these books was alive when these presidents were changing the world, but that doesn’t mean the authors are not experts on their subjects. They just have to look at their subject’s life from a historical point of view.

In other words, researching and writing on what has already happened. They have the benefit of clear hindsight and already know how each story ends.

But people living through these important moments don’t know – at the time – how important they might be in the long run. For example, no one including Sam Phillips had any idea how earth shattering the results would be when Elvis Presley first walked into the Sun Recording Studio in Memphis.

John and Paul AppleThe same can be said when the Beatles released Hey Jude. When we first heard it in August 1968 there was nothing on the radar – or even a hint – that we were entering the final phase of their earth-shattering career as a group. It was tuneful, uplifting and joyful. It was the first release on their newly formed Apple Records and would eventually become the Beatles’ all-time biggest selling single.

But looking back clearly with historic hindsight, it’s obvious something was different. First generation fans just didn’t know it at the time.

The Beatles had always been seen as a group. Again with hindsight we can see that wasn’t always exactly the case. For instance, when they performed live the 1963 album track All My Loving, Paul McCartney and George Harrison harmonized on the final verse. This is how it was presented to U.S. fans as the first song during their debut on The Ed Sullivan Show in February 1964. But read the back cover notes on Meet The Beatles (UK title: With The Beatles) and you’ll see Paul double tracked both vocals in the recording studio. Even during their years as a touring band Paul recorded as a “solo artist” on Yesterday, Eleanor Rigby and For No One. Beatles historians know this is also true with various songs by John Lennon and George, with the remaining three primarily serving as a backup band.

But to us they were still a group and everything we looked forward to in 1968 would still be a group effort. Hey Jude didn’t change that perspective, but the demise was on the radar and the final phase was in progress.

————————————————————————

In theaters with the new film Eight Days A Week

The Beatles At Shea Stadium – Restored and Remastered

Read the story behind their greatest concert and making the TV special!

Buy now at Amazon.com

————————————————————————

Following the Revolver album and final tour ending in August 1966, it was almost like they hung a Closed sign on the Beatles shop. After expecting at least two albums a year (more in the U.S. thanks to giving us less songs per LP) and a hit single every couple months, things went silent. The Monkees took over the Fab Four reign for younger teens and the rest of us had to wait until February 1967 for Penny Lane and Strawberry Fields Forever. And it’s no strain of the imagination to say these songs signaled a new psychedelic phase that included Sgt. Pepper and Magical Mystery Tour.

All the backward tape loops, studio effects and trippy lyrical images came to an almost immediate halt just over a year later in March 1968 with Lady Madonna. The song could be considered the group’s original Get Back – since it went back to a basic rock and roll feeling. I say almost because the flip side was the Eastern sitar raga rock track The Inner Light, which was George’s turn as a “solo artist.”

Then they seemed to close up shop again.

maharishi-mahesh-yogiExcept this time they should have hung up a sign saying “On Vacation” since they ditched their world-shattering ways and headed for India to meditate with their guru, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi.

In my opinion (and I’ll never say humble opinion because The Classic Rocker doesn’t have one) something happened. It wasn’t earth shattering enough to make the world news. In fact, if you’ve read enough books on the topic it basically seems like India was a laid-back (boring?) time of reenergizing by the most famous frazzled foursome of their era. But they definitely changed. I believe India is where the cracks that eventually caused the final split started. Each member vacationed into his own mind and spirit and stopped being the shared four-headed monster as Mick Jagger described them during his Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction speech.

They wrote enough songs to fill the upcoming double album The Beatles (renamed The White Album by first generation fans) but when they returned to the recording studio and the public eye they weren’t the Beatles of All My Loving, Sgt. Pepper or even Lady Madonna. The dynamics had changed. Hey Jude was by Paul McCartney and the Beatles while the flip side, Revolution, could be credited to John Lennon and the Beatles.

And it would continue this way until The End (final song on Abbey Road). And by the way – I told you I’m not humble in my opinions. We didn’t know it at the time, but hindsight makes it all very clear.

Hey Jude joined the Dream Song List on March 20th. From my opinionated dissertation above you already know I own more than a few copies including my original vinyl 45 rpm. And though it’s hard to believe because the song is still the flag-waving “hey remember us!” standard everyday reminder of the Beatles earth-shattering and world-dominating career and is a constant on every respectable classic rock radio playlist – I hadn’t heard it in awhile. So surprisingly, it goes into the subliminal chart listing.

Wait – a Beatles fan that hadn’t heard Hey Jude in awhile? Please don’t go for a non-humble bad opinion of me. But I’ll have to admit if there is one Beatles song that could ever possibly be overplayed, this is it. Of course now that I’ve written these ramblings while listening to Hey Jude it turns out I can’t hear it enough. It’s currently set for an unlimited run on my digital playlist.

————————————————————————

Classic Rock Logo

Follow The Classic Rocker

Then visit Dave’s author page on Amazon.com

————————————————————————

August 1968 was the first new music we had from the Beatles in at least five months. It was only one month less than the length of time we waited between Revolver and Penny Lane. In hindsight it seems like a blink of an eye. But when you lived through it their absence made us feel they were on a permanent vacation and the shop was closed for good. Fortunately we still had a couple years left but in hindsight the writing was on the wall.

My first memory of Hey Jude was on a Friday evening at the beginning of my sophomore year in high school. Summer vacation was history and I was psyched and nervous for my first show as a member of the school marching band. Since I was still almost a year away from being old enough to drive, I was hanging around in my uniform waiting for one of my buddies to pick me up when this instant classic came on the radio. If he was outside in his car waiting I didn’t notice. There was no way I was leaving until the final “Na-na-na’s” had faded out.

Hey Jude CameraBut (another) wait – The Classic Rocker wasn’t a jock in school? Don’t make quick opinionated judgments. I had more fun playing music, even though I could run faster and jump higher than maybe one or two guys I went to school with. I proved that on the basketball and track teams through junior high and into high school. But when it became all too apparent I had zero interest in touching a basketball when there was a guitar or trumpet nearby and found running around a track as boring as listening to a radio station that didn’t play the Beatles, the jock stuff went on vacation and eventually closed down.

The decision wasn’t difficult to make, especially when an idiotic (told you I was opinionated) gym teacher (slash) basketball coach told me my (perhaps an inch long?) hair made me look like a girl. It didn’t because in those days there were still school dress codes for boys that included hair off our ears and collars. But wanting me to emulate his outdated crew cut style was a challenge worthy enough to be called a boomer generation dividing line.

And besides, like many musicians before and after, I found it was a lot more fun riding in the bus to sporting events and sitting in the stands with a bunch of girls rather than with a bunch of sweaty jocks. It didn’t take hindsight to know that at the time – and I don’t see it any clearer now than I did in 1968. And to prove that in historical proportion, years later I married one of the marching band majorettes from my high school – so score another one for the music department.

We can also score a HUGE classic rock hit for The Beatles with Hey Jude. Since they had stopped touring two years earlier, here’s the closest any of us ever got to seeing the group perform the song live. Because the musicians union in England prevented musicians from lip-syncing their songs on television, the instrumental backing is pre-recorded, while the microphones are live. Listen carefully and you can hear Paul’s recorded voice under his live vocals. The clip includes a fab introduction by TV host David Frost and an even “fabier” musical intro by the lads themselves.

 

 

To purchase The Beatles 1 with all their No. 1 songs including Hey Jude visit Amazon.com

——————————————————————————–

Twitter

Dave Schwensen is The Classic Rocker and author of The Beatles At Shea Stadium and The Beatles In Cleveland. Visit Dave’s author page on Amazon.com.

Copyright 2016 – North Shore Publishing