Category Archives: cars

#173 – Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey

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#173 – Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey by Paul and Linda McCartney

Paul & Linda

– There’s a short section of road along the south shore of Lake Erie that I drive almost every day. It’s about seven or eight miles from where I’m currently holed-up and for some reason, more often than not, I’m reminded of Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey.

This is a bit of a mind game for me because that doesn’t happen anywhere else. Yeah, certain places might remind me of certain songs, but this is a constant. I make a slight curve, glance up a short hill of mowed grass and regardless of whatever one of the thousands of songs on my playlist is coming through the car speakers, the title of this hit from the 1971 album Ram will flash through my brain.

I know… strange.

Smile Away 4 the camera!

In trying to put my memories together I know the album was released that May, less than a month before I graduated high school. I’ve never owned a vinyl copy, but had an 8-track that I played so often the cover photo of Paul holding the horns of a ram showed serious signs of wear and tear by the time I graduated college four years later. By that time, 8-tracks were relegated to either ancient history or collector’s items. It’s now on my digital playlist – which is a current technology that fools me into thinking I’m not that ancient – but I hadn’t heard it in awhile.

So when I woke up with the song playing through my mind on August 25 it immediately went into the subliminal category of Dream Songs. And I guess that makes it a double-whammy when it comes to mind games (and yeah, I was thinking of the John Lennon album as I wrote that) because I also know I’ll drive past that mowed hill of grass within the next day or two and whammy! Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey will be subliminally traveling with me again.

Since the song wasn’t released as a single until later that summer I can only guess it was already receiving radio airplay in advance, or I had propped my state-of-the-art portable 8-track player on the passenger seat of my mother’s car (since I didn’t have my own), using the cigarette lighter as a power source. If Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey was playing all those decades ago while – by chance – I was cruising along this piece of road, it must have made quite the mental impression.

I have no other explanation why that happens. But there is another memory…

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There was bit of a red flag feeling that went up with this song. The Beatles had been the most consistent hit-making band since I was a preteen in 1964. The Rolling Stones had been around almost as long, but were only just moving into their Golden Era off the LP Let It Bleed and released the month before Ram, Sticky Fingers. Led Zeppelin had also become a favorite, but both groups were still in the rear view mirror when it came to The Beatles.

Two thirds of writers

With three major songwriters competing for spots on their albums, you knew there wouldn’t be a dud in the bunch. John Lennon and Paul McCartney regularly supplied number one hits and George Harrison had come into his own as a writer. The winter before he seemed to pass the other two as a solo artist with the classic LP All Things Must Pass.

John had become the Working Class Hero and Paul once again demonstrated his talent with his first self-titled album and the single Maybe I’m Amazed.

And though boomers continued to hold out hope for a Fab Four reunion after Abbey Road and Let It Be, Paul’s second LP Ram (with his new writing and performing partner, wife Linda) really made it clear there was a major separation between him and his former mates as songwriters.

But we should have seen it coming…

When you listen to Abbey Road, the actual final Beatles record (Let It Be was recorded earlier and released later) it was obvious then. Harrison’s Something and Here Comes The Sun, and Lennon’s Come Together are mainstays in Beatles Best Of collections, near the top in Beatles song rankings and highlights in the decades later LOVE show in Las Vegas and the CD.

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McCartney’s main contributions to the album (other than song snippets with Lennon’s on the side two Medley) were Maxwell’s Silver Hammer and Oh, Darling! Don’t get me wrong – I love both. But they’re more light-weight pop songs and when compared to the before-mentioned Lennon and Harrison classics they never seemed to rank as high on the Beatles Hit Parade.

There’s no doubt McCartney deserves every award and accolade he’s received. But when the hard rockers were taking over in the early 1970’s he seemed to be moving a few steps back into the pop category. Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey has always been a favorite, but releasing it as a single during Spring 1971 didn’t help raise his cool factor.

Rock and rollers

To put it into perspective, as mentioned I was graduating high school. At our graduation parties where dancing and 3.2% beer were legal and common for 18-year olds in Ohio at that time – do you think we were rocking out to Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey or Brown Sugar, Gimme Shelter and Whole Lotta Love?

No need to answer. If you’re a first generation Classic Rocker, I’ll rest my case.

Ram was a huge hit in 1971, along with just about everything involving any of the Beatles during this era. Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey may have been too pop for much of the Woodstock Generation and too close on the heels of the bubble gum music fad that drove many of us away from AM radio, but McCartney was still writing great tunes and rocking out. One of them, and undoubtedly my favorite from the album, is Too Many People, which came in at #261 on this Dream Song list. It’s rare when an artist has two songs on this list – let alone two songs from the same album (other than a Greatest Hits Collection). It just another example of McCartney’s ability to write catchy tunes.

Oh, there’s one other lasting memory…

My dad had a favorite uncle. He was much older and lived in Michigan, but they were always close. And of course his name was Uncle Albert. The first time my dad heard this song coming from my transistor radio at our family bakery, he stopped working (for a brief moment), looked at me, smiled and said, “Uncle Albert?” Yeah, I’ll always have that memory.

Have a comment? Please use the form below – and keep rockin’!

Since I don’t know if the McCartney’s ever performed the song live or made an official video, here’s something I’ve found online. The song is heard over family home movies, which will give you an idea of what Paul and Linda were doing following the breakup of The Beatles and before the mega-success of their group Wings.

 

 

To purchase Ram with Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey (along with Too Many People and other great tracks) visit Amazon.com

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Dave Schwensen is The Classic Rocker and author of The Beatles At Shea Stadium and The Beatles In Cleveland. Visit Dave’s author page on Amazon.com.

Copyright 2018 – North Shore Publishing

 

 

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#183 – Rock Your Baby

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#183 – Rock Your Baby by George McCrae

 – This song is a snapshot in time. In my case, I’m not sure it’s one I want to look back on. To put this in perspective, some of you with short memories or worse yet, have kids that enjoy making fun of what you were like as a kid might come across an old box of photos.

You’re like, “Hey, check this out. Here’s a photo of me when I was really little. Look how cute I was…

But no matter how hard we try, nobody ever stays as cute as they were as a little kid. Maturity has a habit of doing that. So now your kids – or your short memory – continue to dig through the box of old photos documenting your personal aging process. There’s visual evidence of middle school and high school – including your prom and graduation photos. And when it comes to baby boomers, eventually everyone lands in the mid 1970’s.

Did we… really?

For those of you that lived through it, you already know what I’m talking about.

For younger boomers, this was the first time many of us were on our own. We were out of the house and away from any parental supervision and school dress codes that might have influenced the way we looked. Granted, some of my good friends were serving in the military where government regulations commanded a conformed look with uniforms and haircuts. But for a lot of us on college campuses or as members of the workforce, all hell was breaking loose when it came to what we looked like thanks to mid-1970’s fashion sense.

If you’re having a hard time following this verbal rambling (and I’ll get to the song in a moment), here’s what you need to do. Depending on where you fit in the boomer age scale, if you were at least eighteen and younger than thirty in 1974, dig through your old photos from that era. For those younger or older looking to have a good laugh at our expense, do an online search for 70’s fashion trends.

I’m sure you’ll run into a few memorable snapshots in time…

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In our defense we were cool, or at least thought we were. But the visual evidence of our once misconstrued beliefs can sometimes be a bit cringe worthy. For guys we’re looking at big hair, mustaches and bellbottoms that were skin tight down to our knees then would flair out to cover our platform shoes. For girls… well, it was the same – hopefully without the mustaches.

The look!

For an immediate mental visual, think mid-70’s Tony Orlando, Michael Jackson (or better still, Jermaine) and Farrah Fawcett. Yeah, now you’ve got the picture… or snapshot from our time.

And for a soundtrack, think Rock Your Baby by George McCrae.

During the summer of 1974 there was no escaping this song. It hit number one on the music charts and since a lot of us college-aged boomers were relegated to only AM radio in our cars, it was heard constantly on every Top 40 station’s playlist. Disco was firmly settling in for a long run and if your car wasn’t equipped with an 8-track to supply the need for rock, you were force-fed the trend during every road trip.

As a confession, I followed the 70’s fashion trend. In fact, I can’t remember any of my friends that didn’t. We were in our late teens or early twenty’s and just like the generations before us, we did our best to look cool.

Too bad the old photos do nothing to prove that fact. I had been told more than a few times I looked like Tony Orlando and it never bothered me – until that fact was pointed out decades later when looking at my old college photos.

Rock Your Baby disco’d (not rocked) onto this Dream Song list on July 31st. Loosely comparing its inclusion to a line Groucho Marx once delivered about shooting an elephant in his pajamas, “How he got into my pajamas I’ll never know.”

That’s how I feel about this song disco’ing (not rockin’) through my mind as I woke up – in my own pajamas. I don’t really know why…

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Was it ingrained into my memory because it was such a huge hit during my college years? Yeah, I guess so. Did I like it? Not really. Did I dance to it? Well… yeah – who didn’t? But it definitely goes into the subliminal category since I’ve never owned a copy and haven’t heard it since… well, probably 1974.

In the name of research to make these Classic Rocker ramblings more meaningful than cringe worthy, I went online to look at a video of McCrae performing Rock Your Baby. Unfortunately, it dredged up another memory and the result is another confession.

Fashion sense

I once owned a leisure suit.

I’m positive it was given to me as a Christmas gift by my mother, who did her best to stay current with fashion trends. But the blame ends there – because I wore it. The two piece leisure suit was made with a brown, suede-like material and had a short-cut jacket and bellbottoms that were tight to my knees, then flared out over my high heeled (not platform) shoes. To complete the ensemble I wore a shiny silver shirt and a wide belt with a big buckle.

Cool?

Since I wore it around the time George McCrae was topping the charts with this disco classic I might have thought so. Since then I’ve done my best to push it out of my memory – except it keeps coming back like a bad dream.

So is there anything else I need to say about this song? Nothing from my personal point of view. I’ve already admitted too much. Instead I’ll crawl back into my Classic Rocker mindset and try and ease the pain of embarrassment from using Tony Orlando as a fashion icon and knowing a leisure suit once helped shape my college image.

But I’m also not someone who knocks music others might love and bring back great memories. As mentioned, Rock Your Baby was a huge number one hit in the summer of 1974. It sold over eleven million copies, making it one of less than forty singles to have ever sold more than ten million or more copies. Obviously for some boomers it was the song of the summer.

But let’s keep that for long memories rather than short.

If you want to look cool today, make sure none of your kids ever discover a leisure suit hanging next to a pair of bellbottoms in your bedroom closet. I suggest maturing boomers store these memories someplace hard to find – like in boxes with your 70’s photos and posters of Farrah Fawcett, Michael Jackson (or Jermaine) and Tony Orlando.

For your own leisure suit memory, here’s a video of George McCrae performing Rock Your Baby.

To purchase Rock Your Baby – The Very Best Of visit Amazon.com

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Dave Schwensen is The Classic Rocker and author of The Beatles At Shea Stadium and The Beatles In Cleveland. Visit Dave’s author page on Amazon.com.

Copyright 2018 – North Shore Publishing