#206 – She Loves You

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#206 – She Loves You by The Beatles

She Loves You – This was the drum roll into the 1960’s as many of us prefer to remember the decade. Yeah (yeah yeah), the “official” turn of the clock from the 50’s was four years earlier for U.S. baby boomers, but play any of us the opening of She Loves You and the reaction is similar to the first time we ever saw a color television.

Our senses took a direct hit and we were launched into the Swingin’ 60’s.

Okay, for a lot of us in early 1964 the only swingin’ we did was on a grade school playground, but it was obvious our world was changing. Only three months before (the length of summer vacation from school) JFK was in The White House and clean-cut pop crooners dominated the music charts. Folk music was considered edgy and the older generation(s) still made the rules.

Then it all changed. I set the date for this new wave at February 9, 1964.

My first notice of The Beatles was on Friday, January 3rd when Jack Parr showed a short film clip focused mainly on the group’s apparently out-of-control screaming audiences. At the beginning you can barely hear the song From Me To You. Then it switches to shots of The Beatles in collarless jackets performing She Loves You. This was after Parr’s tenure as host of The Tonight Show. Johnny Carson had taken over late nights in 1962 and The Jack Parr Program aired in primetime on NBC for one hour every Friday.

For many of us it was our first exposure to the now famous lyrics, “Yeah, yeah, yeah.”

That’s important to note because it became a hook for The Beatles early fame in the U.S. From my memory it was pretty common for the older reporters to throw in a “Yeah, yeah, yeah” somewhere in their headlines or articles referring to what “the kids of today” liked or the simplicity of pop music when compared to the older standards.

There was even a report from the British theater world about how the Beatles’ music and influence was infiltrating the upper society in a not-so-sophisticated way. When the 1963 Broadway musical She Loves Me debuted at The West End Theater in London, one of the characters says to another, “She Loves You.” And of course someone in the audience had to finish the obvious by calling out, “Yeah, yeah, yeah.”

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Since the two song snippets aired by Jack Parr were not enough to really grasp onto, most of us didn’t experience the full force of Beatlemania until Ed Sullivan introduced them on February 9th. The first complete song I heard by The Fab Four was All My Loving. Reviewing their performance from that Sunday evening, it’s no wonder we were knocked into another dimension of pre-(or-full-on) teenager. Every song including their rendition of the Broadway showstopper ‘Til There Was You is considered a Beatles classic.

And with She Loves You we were hooked by three shaggy heads singing, “Yeah, yeah, yeah.”

Hold Your HandI still find it strange this wasn’t the song that broke them in America. That didn’t happen until their next single, I Want To Hold Your Hand started getting U.S. radio play in December 1963. Capitol Records, the Beatles’ U.S. record company, refused to even release She Loves You – at first. The 45 rpm vinyl came out on Swan Records and did absolutely nothing until Beatlemania hit about six months later. Then it followed I Want To Hold Your Hand as the No. 1 song in March 1964.

Capitol wised-up that the group was making money for a rival label and very quickly took ownership from Swan and included the hit song on The Beatles Second Album released in April.

I’m sure The Beatles, their manager Brian Epstein and also movie director Richard Lester understood that “Yeah, yeah, yeah” was an important element in the group’s carefree image portrayed in the film A Hard Day’s Night. Though She Loves You would have already been considered an “oldie” (recorded in July 1963) when the Beatles’ first film was released in the summer of 1964, it was still included with their latest songs in the final concert sequence. I Want To Hold Your Hand wasn’t.

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Painesville, Ohio – Monday, December 19, 2016.

1966 Poster

The Classic Rocker will present The Beatles In Cleveland at Morley Library. Doors open at 6:30 pm with a display of Beatles memorabilia and FAB music. Program begins at 7 pm. Admission is FREE but seating is limited. Reservations are suggested by calling 440-352-3383. Includes rare films of the riotous concerts at Public Hall and Cleveland Stadium and never-before published photos. Books will be available at a special library discount following the program (think holiday shopping!). Morley Library is located at 184 Phelps Street, Painesville, OH 44077. Hope to see you there!

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Now putting my personal memory to use…

Following their February 9th debut on The Ed Sullivan Show, kids I knew had to have a copy of I Want To Hold Your Hand. I don’t remember how I got to my local record store since February in northern Ohio has always been too cold for a bike ride, but somehow I scored a copy of the 45 rpm (backed with I Saw Her Standing There) that week. But I really wanted an album.

That Saturday night my parents went on a “date night” shopping trip and surprised me with the LP Introducing The Beatles. Yeah (yeah, yeah) I had cool parents. But I really wanted the album showing their faces in half shadow and with shaggier hair. A week later I tagged along on their “date night” (three’s a crowd?) and came home with Meet The Beatles.

But none of these included She Loves You (no, no, no!). Once again, since I was only ten years old and my bike was not going to see the light of day until after the first thaw of spring, I had to rely on frequent Top 40 AM radio play to hear the song. Eventually within a couple weeks I ended up in a department store record section with a copy of She Loves You.

swanIt was on the smaller Swan label – and yes I still have it.

The song earned a spot on the Dream Song List on April 16th. Of course I own numerous copies, but it hadn’t been on my digital playlist for awhile, so it goes down as a subliminal memory. But with a hook as powerful as “Yeah, yeah, yeah” I’m sure it’s also been subliminally stuck in many other baby boomer’s minds for over half a century.

The song’s brief opening drum riff immediately transports us back to this era. It’s as important to the Beatles unique soundtrack as the count “1, 2, 3, FOUR!” in I Saw Her Standing There and the opening chord of A Hard Day’s Night. The song could have just opened with John, Paul and George singing “She Loves You, yeah, yeah, yeah” but it wouldn’t have been the same. The powerful impact of the drums sets the frantic tone that follows.

RingoThis credit goes to Ringo Starr. A number of years ago some music novices tried to downplay his importance and even suggested he wasn’t a great drummer. I’m pretty sure these knucklehead critics were either shouted down or embarrassed into obscurity. Their preferred heavy-fisted drum pounders or light-touching jazz percussionists could never have had the same impact. Ringo’s playing enhanced the vocalists and kicked in a beat that set the song’s pace without overwhelming what followed.

In my book that makes Ringo one of the best rock and roll drummers of all time. Case closed.

In 2009 it was announced She Loves You was the Beatles’ all time, top-selling single in England. That’s more than Hey Jude, I Want To Hold Your Hand and all the others. I’m sure it had to do with the hook. “Yeah, yeah, yeah” is tough to forget – even more than a half century later.

And here they are – in the glorious early days of technicolor – The Beatles singing She Loves You (yeah, yeah, yeah)!

To purchase The Beatles 1+ with She Loves You and every “must have” song visit Amazon.com

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Dave Schwensen is The Classic Rocker and author of The Beatles At Shea Stadium and The Beatles In Cleveland. Visit Dave’s author page on Amazon.com.

Copyright 2016 – North Shore Publishing

 

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